Victor Legacy Recording Studios

The New York recording studios of the Victor Talking Machine Co. first came to be in 1903 in Room 826 of the Carnegie Hall Annex. From there, it would expand greatly and at an incredibly rapid rate. The many Victor run studios of New York would see some of the greatest acts pass through them. They would be the birthplace of countless hits from opera to jazz to rock & roll. Enrico Caruso, the esteemed operatic tenor, would record his first Victor Record in New York at the Carnegie Hall Annex Studio. However, this leased studio space was short-lived, only operating for a briefly over a year for a number of reasons. First, the annex was very close to practice rooms for music students (which did not lend itself to being an entirely productive recording environment), and second, the facilities simply weren’t large enough to accommodate Victor’s ever expanding catalogue of artists and their demand for studio time. Though Victor’s New York chapter had humble beginnings, it would soon take on take on a life of it’s own of epic proportions. Over the years many studios were established that would ultimately house legends and see the recording of industry greats such as Elvis Presley, Duke Ellington, Benny Goodman, Glenn Miller, Frank Sinatra, The Guess Who, and many more.

Click the tabs to explore our archival information about Victor’s legendary New York recording studio complex!

Carnegie Hall

VICTOR ‘Carnegie Hall’ RECORDING STUDIO (NYC)

ADDRESS:

881 7th Ave, Room 826

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1903-1904

DEMOLISHED:

Existing

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

Carnegie Hall is the most famous performing center in the United States, perhaps even in the world.

5th Avenue

VICTOR ‘5th Avenue’ RECORDING STUDIO (NYC)

ADDRESS:

234 5th Ave

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1904-1909

DEMOLISHED:

sometime before 1940

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

Victor set up their first purposely built studio in New York at this address. 5 years, they expanded and moved uptown.

28th Street

ADDRESS:

37-39 E. 28th Street

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1909-1916

DEMOLISHED:

Existing

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

38th Street

VICTOR ‘38th Street’ RECORDING STUDIO (NYC)

ADDRESS:

46 w. 38th S, 12th Floor

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1917-1921

DEMOLISHED:

Existing

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

In February 1917, the first jazz recording, “Livery Stable Blues” was recorded in the top floor Victor studio by The Original Dixieland Jazz Band.

National Association Building

VICTOR ‘National Association Building’ RECORDING STUDIO (NYC)

ADDRESS:

28 W. 44th Street, 22nd Floor

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1921-1940s

DEMOLISHED:

Existing

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

Along with the Gramercy Studio, Victor operated this studio well into the 1940s.

Gramercy

VICTOR ‘Gramercy’ RECORDING STUDIO (NYC)

ADDRESS:

155 E 24th Street

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1921-1969

DEMOLISHED:

1990s

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

At this Studio, Elvis recorded “Hound Dog” and “Don’t Be Cruel” in 1956. Hoagy CARMichael recorded “Georgia On My Mind” here in 1930, and “Shout” by The Isley Brothers was recorded here. During the 1960s, The Guess Who recorded two albums here, and the 60s anthem, “Get Together” was recorded by the Youngbloods here. Great jazz artists such as Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, Bud Powell, Sonny Rollins, Paul Desmond, Nina Simone, Harry Belafonte, and Charles Mingus loved to record here.