Victor Legacy Recording Studios

The Los Angeles Plant of the Victor Talking Machine Co. was Victor’s 2nd plant on the West Coast following the establishment of the Oakland, California Plant several years prior. Oakland, California during the scouting period between 1920 and 1924 appeared to be ‘the next big thing’ on the West Coast, with many industries (including Columbia Phonograph Co.) setting up shop in the kinder climates north of southern California. Victor’s competition in the market grew between those years to include an entirely new industry: RADIO. The introduction of the radio slowed record and record player (Victrola) sales by a serious enough amount for Victor to be forced into entering two industries that were developing, radio and film.

Victor’s Oakland Plant was an impressive but quaint 10 acre plot featuring a single 2 story factory building designed to act as a pressing plant, distribution center, and recording studio for California’s budding music and film industries. The idea being that the area would support expansion, with a proposed Victrola assembly and woodshop to be added in the same manner as Victor’s sprawling Camden Plant. By the mid 1920s, the record and record player industries were feeling the competition, so expansion at Oakland was cancelled. Meanwhile, Victor had hit pay-dirt back home in one of their newly converted film soundtrack recording studios in Camden with soundtracks to films like ‘The Jazz Singer’, and the company became critical to providing cutting edge sound design for every major film company in the quickly expanding movie industry. At the same time, the film industry had problems familiar to The Victor Co., such as inventors claiming rights to patents on equipment critical to the filmmaking process. The film industry, however, had a unique solution; move to the farthest point possible from the industrial east coast, as far from patent lawyers and corporate goons as possible. The area they selected to begin their community of filmmaking would become HOLLYWOOD, California, a now very famous neighborhood in the city of Los Angeles. Victor, up until this point, was the largest musical entity in the world, and they converted Victor Trinity Studio A (located in the famous Victor Building #22 - former Trinity Church) to suit every major film production company.

It didn’t take long, but the stunning success of the film industry exploded the demand for more films, and as more film companies left the East Coast to join the exodus to Hollywood, Victor decided to join them by abandoning the expansion of the Oakland Plant. Once in Los Angeles, Victor ended up purchasing a full city block (situated between Orange Drive to Sycamore Avenue between Santa Monica Blvd. and Romaine St.) for the purposes of setting up a truly formidable west coast Victor Talking Machine Co. plant.

The Victor Talking Machine Co. Los Angeles Plant included a pressing plant, assembly/manufacturing/distribution facility, offices, and several medium to large recording facilities custom designed for both West Coast artists and large soundtracks for films coming from the nearby movie production studios.

Click the tabs to explore our archival information about Victor Los Angeles’s legendary recording studio complex!

Victor 'Radio Recorders' Studio

VICTOR ‘Radio Recorders’ RECORDING STUDIO (Los Angeles, CA)

ADDRESS:

7000 Santa Monica Blvd

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1928-1933

DEMOLISHED:

Existing, as LAXART

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

In 1928, Victor purchased an entire block in Hollywood and built 3 studio locations. This location was used as a studio for 5 years. During that time, “Blue Yodel No. 9” was recorded here. In 1949, this studio reopened under the Radio Recorders name, and was a favorite studio of Elvis Presley, Chet Baker, Louis Armstrong, and Jimmie Rodgers.

Victor 'Record Plant' Studio

VICTOR ‘Record Plant’ RECORDING STUDIO (Los Angeles, CA)

ADDRESS:

1032 N. Sycamore Ave

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1930s

DEMOLISHED:

Existing, as the Record Plant, Los Angeles

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

Victor built a second annex studio here and used it during the 1930s. Radio Recorders took over the space in the 1960s and was known as the Radio Recorders Annex. In 1986, the Record Plant moved to this location. It is still a popular studio, and has been used by everybody from Elvis Presley, Lady Gaga, Katy Perry, Ariana Grande, Britney Spears, Beyoncé, Kanye West, and Rhianna.

Hollywood

VICTOR ‘Hollywood’ RECORDING STUDIO (Los Angeles, CA)

ADDRESS:

1016 N Sycamore Ave

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1929-1940s

DEMOLISHED:

The Left wing of the building still exists

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

Victor operated a studio and pressing plant in this location. Frank sinatra made his solo debut here, recording “Night and Day” and three other songs.
Thousands of records were pressed here throughout the 40s, 50s, and 60s.

Vine Street

VICTOR ‘Vine Street’ RECORDING STUDIO (Los Angeles, CA)

ADDRESS:

1510 Vine Street

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1949-1964

DEMOLISHED:

Unknown

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

This studio captured early R&B and the very beginnings of Rock & Roll until the move to Sunset Blvd in 1964.

Music Center of the World

VICTOR ‘Music Center Of The World’ RECORDING STUDIO (Los Angeles, CA)

ADDRESS:

6363 Sunset Blvd

YEARS OF OPERATION:

1964-1977

DEMOLISHED:

Existing, as the Los Angeles Film School

SIGNIFICANCE TO MUSIC INDUSTRY:

“Satisfaction” and many Rolling Stones hits during the 60s were recorded here, in addition to “Surrealistic Pillow” by Jefferson Airplane, and the Grateful Dead’s 1967 debut record.